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Religion & Society Year 10 - Ethics: Personal Ethics

Personal ethics - ethics and me, Global ethics, exploring ethics - exploration of ethical concepts and decision making, community/business ethics - the role ethics plays in the business world, medical ethics -issues, Oxford debate.

Rating Personal Issues

 

 

Rate each of these personal ethical issues in terms of its importance to you or to your age group.

(A rating of ‘5’ indicates ‘very important’, while ‘1’ indicates ‘not at all important’. Other ratings ‘2 to 4’ indicate degrees between these two extremes.)

 

Decisions about how I express my sexuality                                                  1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about lying to get out of trouble                                                      1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about taking or not taking illegal drugs                                          1          2          3          4          5 

Standing up for another person being (racially) abused                                 1          2          3          4          5

Decisions about whether, or how much to, drink alcohol                              1          2          3          4          5 

Importance of popularity within the friendship group                                     1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about doing whatever I like, as long as no one is hurt                   1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about environmental choices (eg. use of recycled paper)             1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about loyalty and honesty in relationships                                     1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about reporting someone you see doing something wrong           1          2          3          4          5         

Honesty in your part-time employment                                                          1          2          3          4          5 

Giving money or time in support of worthy causes                                        1          2          3          4          5 

Keeping confidences                                                                                      1          2          3          4          5 

Loyalty to family members                                                                             1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about whether or not to cheat on my exams                                  1          2          3          4          5

Decisions about whether or not to download pirated material                       1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about whether or not to use plagiarised material in essays           1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about balanced use of my time                                                       1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about personal integrity                                                                   1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about religious beliefs and their impact on my daily life                  1          2          3          4          5 

Decisions about the influence of peer group pressure on behaviour.              1          2          3          4          5 

Importance of appearance                                                                              1          2          3          4          5 

Significance of sporting prowess                                                                    1          2          3          4          5

Ranking Personal Values

Ranking Values:

Ideas and processes that have the power to shape our behaviour are called VALUES. Values can be positive or negative – thay can guide behaviour by acting positively (for example, ‘I’d like to be thought well of by others’) or they can influence behaviour negatively through the person seeking to avoid association with a certain value (for example, ‘I would not like to be thought lazy by others’).

Our VALUES are important for us, they guide our behaviour – the stronger the value, the more likely we will act upon it. Rank the values in this list on a scale of 1 to 10, according to their importance to you.

‘1’ indicates most important, while ‘10’ indicates least important:

 

POPULARITY                                                                       SUCCESS 

ACCEPTANCE                                                                     FRIENDSHIP 

INTEGRITY                                                                          AGGRESSION 

ATTRACTIVENESS                                                             FREEDOM

SECURITY                                                                            POWER 

INTELLIGENCE                                                                   STRENGTH 

SENSITIVITY                                                                       SPORTING ACHIEVEMENT 

WEALTH                                                                               ADVENTURE 

LOYALTY                                                                             EDUCATION 

HONESTY                                                                             FAMILY HAPPINESS 

HUMOUR                                                                              EDUCATION 

FUN                                                                                        SOCIAL JUSTICE 

BALANCE                                                                             POLITENESS 

RESPECT                                                                               WISDOM

Principles of Personal Ethics

Personal ethics might also be called morality, since they reflect general expectations of any person in any society, acting in any capacity. These are the principles we try to instill in our children, and expect of one another without needing to articulate the expectation or formalize it in any way.

Principles of Personal Ethics include:

Concern for the well-being of others
Respect for the autonomy of others
Trustworthiness & honesty
Willing compliance with the law (with the exception of civil disobedience)
Basic justice; being fair
Refusing to take unfair advantage
Benevolence: doing good
Preventing harm

Guidelines for Ethical Decision-Making

(Taken from Chapters 3 & 4, Chaos or Clarity: Encountering Ethics, Editions 2 & 3, and Chapter 6, Ethics and Morality)

 

In order to arrive at a reasonable position about an ethical issue, the following steps (or “Framework”) can be followed: 

1.         Define the issue clearly:

            make sure you understand what the problem actually involves. 

2.         Consider all the relevant information:

list the different arguments that have been put about the issue, along with the people (or groups) who put them. 

3.         Consider your own values:

carefully think through your own values and beliefs that are relevant to the issue. Evaluate the different choices according to your personal values. 

4.         Evaluate the choices and probable consequences:

identify the choices here and the probable consequences of each one - all the advantages and disadvantages.

 

Skills to be considered:

 

1.         (definition)                              perception, intuition, reasoning, coherence,

                                                            consistency, ,integrity.

2.         (information)                           research.

3.         (values)                                   ranking values, conscience.

4.         (options, consequences)          dilemma, evaluation, consistency, integrity.

reflection, overview.

 

One Man Standing

A frightening insight into Melbourne's gangland wars and the corrupt police who allowed them to happen. Detective Sergeant D. S. Illingworth has spent the last four years working for police internal affairs in Victoria helping to weed out crooked police and has brought several successful prosecutions against corrupt police. However this has come at great personal cost with threats on his life and not from the criminals but from members of the police force.